Halfway house residents struggle to buy food, medicine after facility issues run of bad checks | Premium

Dovie Salais

Residents of a private halfway house in Colorado Springs say they struggled for weeks to access personal funds for food, medication and other necessities while their halfway house-issued checks were rejected by banks and check-cashing services.

The snag at Community Alternatives of El Paso persisted despite administrators’ promises to fix the problem and held up money that belongs to residents, who are required to hand over their paychecks and other income as a condition of their incarceration. The halfway house takes out money for rent and restitution and issues residents periodic allowances.

Remaining funds in the residents’ accounts are returned, minus any rent and restitution, after their release.  

Starting in late August, CAE’s bank, Community Banks of Colorado, repeatedly refused to honor the allowance checks, but not before some residents believed they had successfully deposited them.

The resulting confusion caused some residents to overdraw their personal checking accounts, deepening their

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Jen Johns named executive director of The Academy of Medicine of Cleveland & Northern Ohio

Dovie Salais

Jen Johns has been named the new executive director of the Academy of Medicine of Cleveland & Northern Ohio (AMCNO), the local physician advocacy group.

Johns will begin on Monday, Oct. 19, replacing Elayne R. Biddlestone, who plans to retire at the end of this year after serving as a staff member and executive vice president/CEO of the AMCNO for a total of more than 40 years, according to a news release.

Before joining the AMCNO, Johns led Cleveland Clinic’s state government relations work in Columbus as the health system’s director of government relations. In her time at the Clinic, she tackled issues including prior authorization reform, telehealth expansions, Medicaid reimbursement, addressing the opioid epidemic and examining scope-of-practice issues, according to the release. She also served as founder and chairwoman of the organization’s internal opioid task force that worked on solutions to the opioid epidemic in Northeast Ohio.

Before the

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New Game Changers in Medicine Episode About the Discovery of the X-Ray Premieres October 14

Dovie Salais

NEW YORK, Oct. 12, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Game Changers in Medicine, the new monthly podcast from Dramatic Health, premieres its fourth episodeX-Rays: This invisible diagnostic light was born in the dark 125 years ago” on October 14, 2020. The use of radiation in medicine and dentistry revolutionized diagnostic techniques, and its applications went beyond the healthcare field to areas like airport security.  Produced by Dramatic Health co-founder and CEO Sean T. Moloney, the series is hosted by renowned medical futurist Dr. Rubin Pillay of the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB).

For details on the podcast series, visit www.gamechangersinmedicine.com 

The Dramatic Health and Game Changers in Medicine teams have gathered a distinguished group of experts to discuss the science and serendipity behind the discovery of the X-ray. Dr. Daniel Margolis, professor of radiology for Weill Cornell Medical College and the head of the

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Southwest Airlines Collaborating with Stanford University School of Medicine for Guidance Regarding the Southwest Promise

Dovie Salais

Stanford Medicine will provide consultation to help shape the evolution of The Southwest Promise – the airline’s multi-layered approach to enhanced cleaning and physical-distancing measures

DALLAS, Oct. 12, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Southwest Airlines Co. (NYSE: LUV) is working with the Stanford University School of Medicine to review the carrier’s multi-layered approach to supporting the well-being of Customers and Employees during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The Southwest Promise encompasses the changes the airline has made to its around-the-clock operations, cleaning procedures, and physical-distancing measures, and representatives from Stanford Medicine will now offer medical advice and protocol recommendations to guide the airline’s ongoing and future efforts during the pandemic.

As part of the collaboration, Southwest will have access to an advisory council comprised of Stanford Medicine’s physician-scientists with knowledge and expertise in infectious diseases, prevention and testing protocols, and the latest medical research about COVID-19. This advisory council will provide insights

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‘Dangerously incompetent’ politicians must go

Dovie Salais

The New England Journal of Medicine, one of the most prestigious medical journals in the world, on Wednesday broke with a nearly two-century tradition of avoiding politics to lambast U.S. politicians for their handling of the coronavirus pandemic.

In a first for the journal, the editors called for Americans to vote out leaders who have not done enough to address the pandemic.

“When it comes to the response to the largest public health crisis of our time, our current political leaders have demonstrated that they are dangerously incompetent,” the editors wrote. “We should not abet them and enable the deaths of thousands more Americans by allowing them to keep their jobs.”

While the 35 editors who signed the editorial did not call out President Donald Trump by name, the article is filled with allusions to his actions.

“The response of our nation’s leaders has been consistently inadequate,” they wrote. “The

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Alain Borczuk, M.D., Named Editor of Archives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

Dovie Salais

The College of American Pathologists (CAP) has appointed Alain C. Borczuk, MD, FCAP, chief of thoracic pathology and professor of pathology at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York, to serve as editor-in-chief of CAP’s peer-reviewed publication, Archives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine.

As former vice chairman of anatomic pathology and current chief of thoracic pathology at Weill Cornell, Dr. Borczuk has served as a full-time surgical pathologist and pulmonary pathologist supporting multidisciplinary clinical programs in neoplastic and non-neoplastic lung diseases, and he has won awards for teaching medical students and residents. A strong advocate for quality assurance and compliance, Dr. Borczuk has served on CAP laboratory inspection teams and participated on a CAP advisory panel to assess molecular testing guidelines in lung carcinoma.

Dr. Borczuk is a graduate of Cornell University Medical College and previously served as vice-chairman and professor of clinical pathology at Columbia University. In 2019, he was

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Michigan Medicine, Janssen now recruiting for phase 3 COVID-19 vaccine trial

Dovie Salais

ANN ARBOR – Michigan Medicine and Janssen, a division of Johnson & Johnson, are now recruiting for a double-blind phase III COVID-19 vaccine clinical trial.

Known as the ENSEMBLE study, the trial will test an investigational vaccine to prevent COVID-19.

The University of Michigan is one of several test sites around the globe supporting the trial, which aims to enroll up to 60,000 volunteers. Researchers hope to enlist a diverse group of participants in the latest trial as part of Operation Warp Speed, a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services public/private partnership.

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“Michigan Medicine is committed to supporting the continued study of the investigational Janssen vaccine and other vaccine candidates. These trials are crucial to moving us toward an effective vaccine,” Marschall Runge, M.D., Ph.D., Dean, U-M Medical School, Executive Vice President, Medical Affairs and CEO,

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Remdesivir study finally published, and an expert in critical care medicine gives us his verdict

Dovie Salais
Remdesivir study finally published – an expert in critical care medicine gives us his verdict
A patient receiving supplemental oxygen is likely to benefit the most. Credit: 99Art/Shutterstock

The results of the ACTT-1 trial, which looked at the effectiveness of remdesivir as a treatment for COVID-19, have finally been published. So far the only drug that has been shown to reduce deaths from the disease has been dexamethasone, a steroid that suppresses the immune system through its anti-inflammatory effects. Steroids have a secondary effect on the disease—they don’t target the virus itself. Remdesivir, on the other hand, goes straight to the cause of the disease by inhibiting the virus.

The drug, which was developed by Gilead Sciences, was approved for use by the US Food and Drug Administration under an “emergency use authorisation” on May 1. It was recently used to treat President Donald Trump.

Gilead Sciences has claimed that the drug has significant benefits for patients—but robust data has been lacking until now. This

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Scientists develop new ‘precision medicine’ approach to treating damaged DNA in pancreatic cancer

Dovie Salais
dna
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Scientists have developed a new “precision medicine” approach to treating the damaged DNA in the cancer cells of Pancreatic Cancer patients.

The findings mark an important step forward for potential treatment options for pancreatic cancer, improving the options and outcomes for a disease where survival rates have remained stubbornly low.

The study detailing the approach—led by the University of Glasgow and published in Gastroenterology—used cell lines and organoids that were generated from patients with pancreatic cancer to develop new molecular markers that can predict who will respond to drugs targeting DNA damage.

The researchers tested these markers using multiple drugs, and have developed a strategy that are now being taken forward into clinical trial. The trial will help doctors and researchers predict which patient will respond to which one of these drugs, either alone or in combination.

Funding for the trail has come from AstraZeneca

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How one hospital organization is tackling racial bias in medicine

Dovie Salais

This report is part of “Turning Point,” a groundbreaking series by ABC News examining the racial reckoning sweeping the United States and exploring whether it can lead to lasting reconciliation.

For years, studies have shown that people of color don’t get the same level of health care as white patients.

Some of these studies include the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s 2018 study which found that Black babies have a higher chance of dying in their first year of life compared to white babies.

Similarly, a study from the Western Journal of Emergency Medicine found that Black and brown Americans waited longer for care in the emergency room than white Americans.

And in 2016, another study from the National Academy of Sciences found that Black Americans were undertreated for pain compared to white Americans.

MORE: Maternal death rate among black women 2.5 times higher than white women, new report

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