Former Queensland and Australian centre Greg Inglis reveals thought of suicide entered mind during mental health battle

Former Storm and Rabbitohs centre Greg Inglis has conceded that the thought of suicide crossed…

Former Queensland and Australian centre Greg Inglis reveals thought of suicide entered mind during mental health battle

Former Storm and Rabbitohs centre Greg Inglis has conceded that the thought of suicide crossed his mind for a split second as he prepares for his rugby league return.

Inglis retired from the NRL last year while playing with South Sydney, moving into an ambassador and coaching role with the club.

Since then, the 33-year-old has struggled with his mental health as he deals with life after retirement, with the Queensland and Australian legend admitting that he hit ‘rock bottom’ after an incident during last year’s Magic Round.

As he prepares for a rugby league return with the Warrington Wolves, Inglis has revealed to Channel Nine that the split-second thought of suicide was the catalyst for him receiving the necessary help.

“I was never to that point of actually doing it but it crossed my mind for a split second,” he said.

“That was enough for me to go out and need more help.

“If someone takes something out of my story, that’s changing someone’s life and hopefully that’s one life saved.”

Along with this, Inglis has opened up on the damaging effects that racial abuse had on his career after Titans forward Tyrone Peachey was allegedly racially abused by Knights second-rower Mitch Barnett on the weekend.

The 267-game veteran admits that it is still a ‘massive problem’ in Australian sport, struggling to understand why it continues to happen in 2020.

“It’s a massive issue in Australian sport,” he said.

“We live in 2020, we’re not living in 1720.

“It’s pretty s*** to be honest. You just think of your family, where you come from and your history. To be racially abused, it’s disheartening.

“I don’t know if it’s just a brain snap or just the way they’ve been raised. It’s not something you pick up, it’s something you’re taught or been around.”

If you or somebody you know are struggling with mental health, call Lifeline on 13 11 14 or visit lifeline.org.au.