MDHHS receives $4.35M to address suicide deaths in Michigan men | News

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services has received $4.35 million to address suicide…

MDHHS receives .35M to address suicide deaths in Michigan men | News

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services has received $4.35 million to address suicide in adult men.

The funding comes from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

More than 6,700 Michiganders lost their lives to suicide from 2014 to 2018, the state said.

Two-thirds of those deaths were adult men.

Over the next five years, the newly funded MDHHS program “Preventing Suicide in Michigan Men” will work to reduce the number of deaths and attempts among men ages 25 and older by at least 10 percent, the state said.

The state hopes to accomplish that goal through carefully planned, implemented and evaluated prevention efforts within communities and healthcare, as well as upstream initiatives before suicide behavior even occurs.

“This year has been especially challenging due to the COVID-19 pandemic and there are a number of stressors facing Michigan adults,” said Dr. Joneigh S. Khaldun, chief medical executive and chief deputy for health. “This grant will help us provide critical mental health supports to men, and prevent suicide and the devastating impact suicide has on entire families and communities.”

The CDC’s new Comprehensive Suicide Prevention Program is the first to take a complete public health approach based on data and science to address the risk factors, the state said.

“Suicide is caused by multiple factors and prevention must go beyond individual behavior change,” said Dr. Deb Houry, director of CDC’s National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. “Support and coordination are needed from every sector of society that can directly promote resilience and reduce risk factors such as isolation, stress, substance use, and relationship, financial and job issues.”

The comprehensive approach to suicide prevention supported by CDC’s funding includes:

  • Strong leadership that convenes multi-sectoral partnerships.
  • Prioritization of data to identify vulnerable populations and to better characterize risk and protective factors impacting suicide.
  • Leveraging existing suicide prevention programs.
  • Selecting multiple and complementary strategies with the best available evidence to fill gaps.
  • Effective communication of progress and outcomes.
  • Rigorous evaluation with built-in quality improvement and sustainability.