Student author hopes book will help fight mental health stigma

WINSTON-SALEM STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENT WHO RECENTLY SELF-PUBLISHED A BOOK AFTER GOING THROUGH HIS DON’T TRAUMA….

Student author hopes book will help fight mental health stigma

WINSTON-SALEM STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENT WHO RECENTLY SELF-PUBLISHED A BOOK AFTER GOING THROUGH HIS DON’T TRAUMA. HE HOPES TO GUIDE OTHERS ON THEIR OWN JOURNEY OF SELF-LOVE. OUR AUDREY BISCOE HAS THE STORY IS A JOURNEY FOR EVERYBODY, ANY RACE, ANY COLOR YOU COULD, MALE OR FEMALE, BECAUSE MENTAL HEALTH AFFECTS EVERYBODY. DIAMANTE CLEMMONS LOST HIS FATHER AT THE AGE OF NINE TO GUN VIOLENCE AFTER NAVIGATING THROUGH YEARS OF DEPRESSION AND ISOLATION. CLEMMONS STARTED TO PURSUE HIS OWN PASSIONS. FOOTBALL, GETTING INVOLVED AT SCHOOL AND LEARNING WHO HE IS OUTSIDE SIDE OF HIS OWN TRAUMA. I KNOW WHEN I LOST MY DAD FOR A LONG TIME, I DIDN’T REALLY ALLOW MYSELF TO CRY OR TO ACTUALLY FEEL WHAT I WAS GOING THROUGH BECAUSE I FELT LIKE THERE WERE CERTAIN THINGS A MAN SHOULD FEEL AND CERTAIN THINGS WE I WOULD HAVE TO DO AS THE HEAD OF THE HOUSEHOLD. HE STARTED TO LEARN WHAT IT MEANS TO FIND SELF-LOVE, AND MOST OF ALL, GRACE. THAT SPACE TO ALLOW YOURSELF TO FEEL SAD, TIRED, HAPPY, WHATEVER IT IS, IS GOING TO GET YOU THROUGH. AND I FEEL LIKE ONCE YOU GIVE YOURSELF THAT GRACE, THAT’S WHEN YOU CAN REJUVENATE. THAT’S WHEN YOU’RE EVEN MORE RESILIENT BECAUSE YOU’RE ADMITTING WHEN YOU’RE DOWN. AT THE SAME TIME, GEMINI WAS HEALING. HE WAS WRITING THE BLUE BOY IS ME, AND HE IS NO LONGER BLUE. INSTEAD, HIS SKIN IS A DEEP BROWN ONE THAT HE HAS GROWN TO LOVE. THAT’S HOW AGAINST THE GRAIN CAME ABOUT. NO MATTER WHAT LIFE THROWS AT ME, I’M GOING TO THROW SOMETHING BACK. SOMETHING EVEN HARDER. SO TO ME, AGAINST THE GRAIN IS ABOUT NOT GIVING UP. AFTER SELF-PUBLISHING HIS BOOK, SUPPORT POURED IN FROM HIS PEERS AND PROFESSORS AT WCBS. YOU AND IT’S REALLY LIKE AN UNREAL FEELING. I CAN’T EVEN EXPLAIN IT BECAUSE I’M STILL IN FRONT OF THE SMILE TOO HARD. BUT I JUST I LOVE IT. GEMINI, HIS MISSION NOW IS TO FIGHT MENTAL HEALTH STIGMA. THE FACT THAT I WROTE IT, IT WAS JUST MORE SO A PROMISE TO MYSELF. A PROMISE THAT I WOULD NEVER LET MYSELF GET THAT LOW. A PROMISE TO LIKE, STAY PUT AND KEEP FAST TO MY DREAMS. SO WRITING WAS KIND OF JUST ME TO ME, JUST HUG ME. THAT’S THE BEST WAY TO SEE. JUST. AFTER GRADUATING FROM WINSTON-SALEM STATE IN THE SPRING, DUMONT HOPES TO PURSUE A CAREER IN LAW ENFORCEMENT. I HAVE A LINK FOR HIS BOOK AGAINST THE GRAIN ON OUR WEBSITE.

First generation high school and WSSU student self publishes book on mental health, trauma

A first generation high school and Winston-Salem State University student self-published a book on mental health after learning how to navigate through his trauma. Jahmonte Clemmons hopes Against the Grain will guide others on their own journey of self-love. “It’s a good read for everybody, any race, any color, male or female because mental health affects everybody,” said Clemmons. At the age of nine, Clemmons lost his father to gun violence. After navigating through years of depression and isolation, Clemmons started to pursue his own passions in life. Things like playing football, getting involved at school and learning who he his outside of his own trauma.“I know when I lost my dad for a long time I didn’t really allow myself to cry or to actually feel what I was going through, because there are certain things a man should feel and certain things I would do as head of the household.”He started to learn what it means to find self-love and most of all, grace. “That space to allow yourself to feel sad, tired, happy, whatever it is will get you through. Once you give yourself that grace, that’s when you can rejuvenate, that’s when you are even more resilient, because you are admitting when you are down,” Clemmons explained. At the same time he was healing, he was writing and that’s how ‘Against the Grain’ came about. “No matter what life throws at me, I am going to hit it back, something even harder, so to me, Against the Grain is about not giving up.”After self-publishing his book, support poured in from his peers and professors at WSSU. “It’s an unreal feeling I can’t even explain it, I am trying not to smile too hard, but I just love it,” he said. His mission now is to fight mental health stigma. He said, “It was a promise to myself, a promise I would never let myself get that low. A promise I would stay put and keep fast to my dreams. Writing was a me to me hug. That’s the best way I see it, a hug.”After graduating from WSSU in Spring 2023, Clemmons hopes to pursue a career in law enforcement. Click here for his book, Against the Grain.

A first generation high school and Winston-Salem State University student self-published a book on mental health after learning how to navigate through his trauma.

Jahmonte Clemmons hopes Against the Grain will guide others on their own journey of self-love.

“It’s a good read for everybody, any race, any color, male or female because mental health affects everybody,” said Clemmons.

At the age of nine, Clemmons lost his father to gun violence. After navigating through years of depression and isolation, Clemmons started to pursue his own passions in life. Things like playing football, getting involved at school and learning who he his outside of his own trauma.

“I know when I lost my dad for a long time I didn’t really allow myself to cry or to actually feel what I was going through, because there are certain things a man should feel and certain things I would do as head of the household.”

He started to learn what it means to find self-love and most of all, grace. “That space to allow yourself to feel sad, tired, happy, whatever it is will get you through. Once you give yourself that grace, that’s when you can rejuvenate, that’s when you are even more resilient, because you are admitting when you are down,” Clemmons explained.

At the same time he was healing, he was writing and that’s how ‘Against the Grain’ came about.

“No matter what life throws at me, I am going to hit it back, something even harder, so to me, Against the Grain is about not giving up.”

After self-publishing his book, support poured in from his peers and professors at WSSU. “It’s an unreal feeling I can’t even explain it, I am trying not to smile too hard, but I just love it,” he said.

His mission now is to fight mental health stigma. He said, “It was a promise to myself, a promise I would never let myself get that low. A promise I would stay put and keep fast to my dreams. Writing was a me to me hug. That’s the best way I see it, a hug.”

After graduating from WSSU in Spring 2023, Clemmons hopes to pursue a career in law enforcement. Click here for his book, Against the Grain.